Paul Loeb on Greg Mortensen and the fetishization of “innovation”

Paul Loeb has just published a nice, thoughtful piece about the Greg Mortensen affair.  I particularly liked the following couple of ‘grafs, because they remind us that our fascination with Mortensen is part of a larger, unhealthy dynamic in which we fetishize “innovation” and “heroes” while ignoring systems approaches and long-term experience.

The arc of Mortenson’s fame also reminds me how much our culture enshrines lone entrepreneurs as the ultimate change agents, while displaying a commensurate disdain for those who’ve long worked in the trenches. We see this in international development, where businesspeople or celebrities receive massive publicity for their glamorous new projects, while groups like Oxfam or CARE that work year after year in local communities are left invisible in the shadows, or presented as dull, bureaucratic, and retrograde in comparison.  We see the same thing with America’s educational debates, where those who talk glibly of solving poverty and inequality with the instant solutions of high stakes testing, charter schools, or eliminating the long-held rights of teachers receive massive attention, while the experiences of those who’ve actually spent 20 or 30 years in the classrooms are disdained and ignored.

Sometimes fresh approaches can shake things up, and Mortenson’s focus on getting Pakistani and Afghan girls enrolled in school may well be one of those transformative ideas. But his books still feed the narrative that the best way to make change is to ignore pretty much anything that anyone else has been doing all along, and to charge ahead with your own Lone Ranger initiatives.

WalkScore hits the New York Times

Congrats to the WalkScore team for being featured in today’s Sunday New York Times!

Founded in July 2007 by Mike Mathieu, the chairman of Front Seat Management in Seattle, WalkScore works with Google
Maps and census data. Type in a street address on the site, and within
seconds a list and map appear showing the nearest grocery stores,
restaurants, gyms, schools and more — all for free.

The site works for any address within the United States, Canada, and even Britain.
It also uses a formula to assign point values to locations within a
mile of the given address. These points yield a final score from 1 to
100 for the address’s overall “walkability.”